Brown girls are magical, brown girls do ballet: Ingrid Silva Q&A

Ingrid Silva gives her insight on the world of ballet for girls trying to break into the industry 

 Photo credits:  Aaron (@underground_nyc)

Photo credits:  Aaron (@underground_nyc)

I grew up watching movies like Save the Last Dance and making fake spins all around the house. As a single parent with three daughters all within a year age range, putting her daughters in dance classes was out the question for my mom. However, that didn't stop me from dreaming or pretending I was prancing across a stage. As I got older, I started to see my love of arts was cultivated more so in a paint brush and creating things with my hands. Those memories of being silly and dancing are still vivid. I wouldn't say every girl but maybe 8 out of 10 girls can probably relate. I always imagined being a ballerina as such an effortless, carefree career. In part of curiosity I wanted to chat with a ballerina to see if it was all glitter and glam. I now know that it is not glitter but it is one of the toughest careers out there, this newfound understanding is due in part to my recent chat with one of the most renowned ballerinas of current, Ingrid Silva. 

Ingrid was born and raised in the suburbs of Brazil and was always engaged in sports. Her interest in ballet stemmed from classes she took at a dance studio near her home when she was 8 years old.  Check out her chat with Beaut&Beast as she discusses her love of ballet and tips for future ballerinas:  

ONLY THOSE WHO WILL RISK GOING TOO FAR CAN POSSIBLY FIND OUT HOW FAR ONE CAN GO
— Ingrid Silva
  1. What advice would you give to women in regards to pursuing their dreams? Believe in yourself and just do it.
  2. What is the culture like in Rio de Janeiro versus in America? It is a completely different culture. Brazilian people are warmer, even with their music and culture. I have been there all my life so there is "no place like home". It is different from American culture and when I first came here, it was hard to adjust. I did not know the language, I had no friends, and it was a completely different environment. However, I will say that in America I was first able to experience all four seasons, that was an awesome experience I will always remember. 
  3. What are some of the challenges of being a ballerina? There are so many challenges! Being a ballerina is hard. It is an art of perfection and every day you have to be better than you were the day before. You also want to be able to be the best artist you can be, all while making your performances look effortless.
  4. What tips would you give to someone pursuing a dancing career? Always be positive, stay focused at all times and love what you do.
  5. Any advice to mothers who want to assist their child in being a ballerina? Well, every family is different. I would say to support your child no matter which decision they make, especially in ballet. It is not an easy career mentally or fiscally and it takes a lot of dedication so you have to make sure you are there to support your kids along the process.
  6. Why is culture and being active in the community so important? Art in general is important because it could change many lives, every one should get to experience it. 
  7. What is Brown Girls Do Ballet and the vision behind it? Brown Girls Do Ballet is an organization that promotes diversity in the arts by providing annual scholarships, mentor networks, and community programs to empower young girls.
  8. Any last advice to girls trying to break into the industry? Always believe in yourself, no matter what. See your purpose in front of you, plan it, and go for it!

To check out more of Ingrid's performances, whereabouts, or activities with the Dance Theatre of Harlem CLICK HERE

For more information regarding Brown Girls Do Ballte CLICK HERE.

 Photo credits:  Aaron (@underground_nyc) 

Photo credits:  Aaron (@underground_nyc)